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BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2013–2014
The BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2013–2014 presents the latest national statistics monitoring BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention. Around 54% of women in the target age group of 50–69 took part in the program, with more than 1.4 million women screening in 2013–2014.Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 42 deaths per 100,000 women.
Breast cancer in young women: key facts about breast cancer in women in their 20s and 30s
Breast cancer in young women is the first national report presenting key data specific to breast cancer in women in their 20s and 30s. This report provides an overview of breast cancer, risk factors for young women, breast cancer detection and diagnosis methods, and key summary measures including incidence, hospitalisations, survival and mortality.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2012–2013
The BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2012–2013 presents the latest national statistics in the monitoring of BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention. Around 55% of women in the target age group 50–69 took part in the program, with more than 1.4 million women screening in 2012–2013.Breast cancer mortality in 2012 was 44 deaths per 100,000 women.
BreastScreen Australia data dictionary: version 1.1
BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention. The BreastScreen Australia Data Dictionary is intended to be the authoritative source of data definitions used by BreastScreen Australia to meet the need for national consistency in data collected for program monitoring and evaluation, and for accreditation of BreastScreen Australia services.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2011-2012
The BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2011–2012 presents the latest national statistics on this national screening program, which aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention. Around 55% of women in the target age group of 50–69 took part in the program, with more than 1.7 million women screening in 2011–2012.Breast cancer mortality is at an historic low, at 44 deaths per 100,000 women.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2010-2011
BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening of women. This report is the latest in an annual series that presents national statistics monitoring the program against performance indicators.More than 1.3 million women in the target age group of 50-69 were screened in 2010-2011, a participation rate of 55%. Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 43 deaths per 100,000 women.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2009-2010
BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening of women. This report is the latest in an annual series that presents national statistics monitoring the program against performance indicators.More than 1.3 million women in the target age group of 50-69 were screened in 2009-2010, a participation rate of 55%. Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 43 deaths per 100,000 women.
Breast cancer in Australia: an overview
Data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of breast cancer in Australia including how breast cancer rates differ by geographical area, socioeconomic status, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and country of birth.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2008-2009
BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce morbidity and mortality from breast cancer through organised breast cancer screening. This report presents national statistics for the program. More than 1.3 million women aged 50-69 participated in BreastScreen Australia in 2008-2009, equivalent to around 55% of the target age group. Deaths from breast cancer are at an historic low at 47 deaths per 100,000 women aged 50-69 in 2007.
Calculating screening rates for bowel cancer: methodologies explained
Although similar concepts, the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program participation monitoring indicator and the National Healthcare Agreement key performance indicator for bowel cancer screening (PI-12) are different measures. Consequently, they produce different results. This paper describes and explains the differences between the two indicators.
Premature mortality from chronic disease
This bulletin uses potential years of life lost to describe mortality patterns for deaths due to chronic disease. It shows that most premature deaths were due to chronic disease. The leading cause of premature mortality among females was breast cancer and among males it was coronary heart disease. Further, the bulletin highlights that a large proportion of premature chronic disease deaths were also potentially avoidable.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008
Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 is the tenth report presenting national statistics (combining data from the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 reporting periods) on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators for BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer through detecting cancers early. Since BreastScreen Australia commenced in 1991, mortality from breast cancer has decreased steadily. Further, more than half of all invasive breast cancers detected by BreastScreen Australia are small, with small breast cancers associated with increased treatment options and improved survival.
Risk of invasive breast cancer in women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ in Australia between 1995 and 2005
This report presents data that show that women who are diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are at significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with invasive breast cancer later on in their lives, even though the DCIS would have been treated appropriately at the time. Thus these women warrant close medical surveillance in order to detect and treat any invasive breast cancers that may arise.
Breast cancer in Australia: an overview, 2009
Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in Australian women with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in 2006, and projections suggest that the number of new cases will continue to grow. A total of 2,618 women died from breast cancer in 2006, making it the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths for women. Trend data indicate that breast cancer mortality rates for females have been declining since the mid 1990s and that outcomes for women diagnosed with breast cancer have improved over recent decades. These and other data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of breast cancer in Australia including how breast cancer rates differ by Indigenous status, country of birth and geographic area.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2005-2006
Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer through detecting cancers early, with over 1.5 million women (56.9%) aged 50-69 years participating in the Program in 2005-2006. Mortality from breast cancer has decreased steadily since the Program commenced in 1991, from 66 to 47 deaths per 100,000 women.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2004-2005
Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer by maximising early detection and reports key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report combines data from state and territory BreastScreen programs, cancer registries and the AIHW mortality database. The audience includes anyone with an interest in breast cancer screening.BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2004-2005 is the eighth annual report based on key program activity. The report presents the most recent information at the national level on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally.The report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or breast screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.
Breast cancer survival by size and nodal status in Australia
Breast cancer survival by size and nodal status provides relative survival data up to nine years after diagnosis for women diagnosed in Australia with breast cancer in 1997. There are breakdowns of survival proportions by size of cancer, nodal status, geographic region and socioeconomic status.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2003-2004
Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer by maximising early detection. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2003-2004 is the eighth annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia program. It presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of ssreening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally. This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or breast screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.
Breast cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006
Breast cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006 provides a comprehensive statistical overview of breast cancer in females and males. The report provides data for include breast cancer incidence to 2002 with projections to 2011, prevalence to 2002, mortality to 2004, survival to 2002, screening to 2002-2003, hospital admissions to 2003-04, Medical Benefits Schedule and Pharmaceutical Benefits Schedule services to 2004-05 and expenditure in 2000-01. The report, commissioned by the National Breast Cancer Centre, will be an important reference for anyone interested in breast cancer and women's health.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2002-2003
Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer by maximising early detection.BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2002-2003 is the seventh annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally.This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or breast screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2001-02
This is the sixth national monitoring report for the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents statistics on BreastScreen Australia screening activity and outcomes for 2001-02. A reporting interval of two years is used because it corresponds with the recommended interval between screens for asymptomatic women in the target age group of 50-69 years.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 1998-1999 and 1999-2000
This report is the fourth annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates.
BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2000-2001
This report is the fifth annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally.
Breast cancer size and nodal status
The aim of the BreastScreen Australia Program is to detect invasive breast cancers in women early while they are small and before they have spread beyond the breast; this gives the best chance of effective treatment.This report presents information on breast cancer size and nodal status supplied by BreastScreen Australia and State and Territory cancer registries. It is based on all invasive breast cancers diagnosed in Australia in 1997, and includes tumours diagnosed in women known to have had breast cancer previously.
National public health expenditure report 1998-99
This report is the first of its type in Australia. It provides public health expenditure information from each of the State, Territory and Commonwealth health departments, based on eight distinct public health expenditure categories: communicable disease control; selected health promotion activities; immunisation; environmental health; food standards and hygiene; breast cancer screening; cervical screening; all other core public health. This report is part of the National Public Health Expenditure Project (NPHEP).

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