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released: 30 Sep 2016 author: AIHW

The BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2013–2014 presents the latest national statistics monitoring BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention. Around 54% of women in the target age group of 50–69 took part in the program, with more than 1.4 million women screening in 2013–2014. Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 42 deaths per 100,000 women.

ISSN 2205-4855 (PDF) 1039-3307 (Print); ISBN 978-1-76054-004-3; Cat. no. CAN 99; 99pp.; $16

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Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Symbols
    • Summary
    • Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Australian women
    • More than half of targeted women participate in BreastScreen Australia
    • Some women are recalled for further investigation
    • More than half the cancers detected by BreastScreen Australia are small
    • Report card
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
      • 1.1 Breast cancer
      • 1.2 Age is the greatest risk factor for breast cancer
      • 1.3 Screening can detect breast cancer early
      • 1.4 Screening mammography decreases mortality from breast cancer
    • 2 Recent change to the target age range of BreastScreen Australia
      • 2.1 Women aged 50–74 now targeted
      • 2.2 Changes to reporting
    • 3 Monitoring BreastScreen Australia using program data
      • 3.1 Screening behaviour
      • 3.2 Sensitivity of the screening test
      • 3.3 Detection of invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ
    • 4 Monitoring BreastScreen Australia using AIHW data
      • 4.1 Incidence of breast cancer
      • 4.2 Incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ
      • 4.3 Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer
      • 4.4 Prevalence of breast cancer
      • 4.5 Mortality from breast cancer
    • 5 Monitoring other aspects of BreastScreen Australia
      • 5.1 Expenditure on BreastScreen Australia
  • End matter
    • Appendix A: Supporting data tables
      • A1 Participation
      • A2 Rescreening
      • A3 Recall to assessment
      • A4 Invasive breast cancer detection
      • A5 Ductal carcinoma in situ detection
      • A6a Interval cancers
      • A6b Program sensitivity
      • A7a Invasive breast cancer incidence
      • A7b Ductal carcinoma in situ incidence
      • A8 Mortality
    • Appendix B: BreastScreen Australia information
      • Performance indicators
      • National Accreditation Standards (NAS) Measures
    • Appendix C: Data sources
      • State and territory BreastScreen registers
      • AIHW Australian Cancer Database
      • AIHW National Mortality Database
      • ABS population data
      • AIHW Disease Expenditure Database
    • Appendix D: Classifications
      • Age
      • State or territory
      • Remoteness area
      • Socioeconomic group
      • Classification of invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ
    • Appendix E: Statistical methods
      • Comparisons and tests of statistical significance
      • Crude rates
      • Age-specific rates
      • Age-standardised rates
      • Confidence intervals
    • Glossary
    • References
    • List of tables
    • List of figures
    • List of boxes
    • Related publications
    • Supplementary online data tables

Recommended citation

AIHW 2016. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2013–2014. Cancer series no. 100. Cat. no. CAN 99. Canberra: AIHW.

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