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Hospitalised injury in Australia

Almost half a million people (461,307) were hospitalised in Australia as a result of an injury in 2013–14, and in 2012–13 nearly 12,000 (11,679) people died as a result of an injury.

Most injuries requiring hospitalisation in Australia happen as a result of transport accidents, falls, self-harm and assault, while most deaths from injuries happen as a result of falls and suicide. Deaths also result from transport accidents and unintentional poisoning.

These pages summarise key findings about injury hospitalisations and deaths in Australia. Data about patients admitted to hospital as a result of an injury are drawn from the National Hospital Morbidity Database. Information about injury deaths in Australia is based on data from the AIHW National Mortality Database.

More detailed information on injury hospitalisations and deaths, including trends over time, can be found in:


Injury hospitalisations


donut chart shows 56% males, 44% females.

461,307

people were injured severely enough to be admitted to hospital during 2013–14. Males made up 56% of these cases.


Bar chart shows 2 times as many Indigenous Australians as other Australians.

2 times

Indigenous people were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital as the result of an injury as other Australians.


Icon for older people.

103,025

older Australians (aged 65 and over) were hospitalised as the result of a fall in 2013–14. Most them were women (67%).


Injury deaths


donut chart shows 59% males, 41% females.

11,679

people died as a result of an injury in 2012–13. Males made up 59% of these cases.


Bar chart shows 2 times as many Indigenous Australians as other Australians.

2 times

Indigenous people were twice as likely to die of an injury as other Australians.


Icon for older people.

51%

of people who died as a result of an injury in 2012–13 were over the age of 65.