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Health care expenditure on cardiovascular diseases 2004-05

Health care expenditure on cardiovascular diseases 2004-05 presents summary data of allocated health expenditure collected by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This report presents comparisons of allocated expenditure on cardiovascular disease over time and relative to other disease types. In addition, breakdowns of allocated expenditure according to age, sex and health sector are presented. This report is a useful resource for policy-makers, researchers and health professionals interested in cardiovascular disease.

Cardiovascular disease and its associated risk factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2004-05

Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem in Australia, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples carrying the greatest burden of illness and death from this disease. Up-to-date estimates on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and its associated risk factors are important for monitoring their impact on the health of Indigenous Australians. This report presents national-level information for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and its associated risk factors, as well as on cardiovascular deaths. Results are based mostly on analysis of the Australian Bureau of Statistics' most recent National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey and National Health Survey conducted in 2004-05.

Comorbidity of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease in Australia

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease are three common and serious illnesses in Australia. These three diseases have shared common risk factors, and often occur together. The National Centre for Monitoring Cardiovascular Disease and the National Centre for Monitoring Diabetes have collaborated to investigate the association of these diseases and their impact on Australians' health and health systems. This report is the first output of this project, and it focuses on examining the current extent of comorbidity of the conditions from three perspectives: self-reported prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths.

Medicines for cardiovascular health: are they used appropriately?

Medicines for cardiovascular health: are they used appropriately? covers trends in prescription and supply of these medicines, patterns of supply by geographic area and patient socioeconomic level, whether patients take medicines as intended, adverse events associated with these medicines, initiatives to improve the quality of use of medicines, and government expenditure on cardiovascular medicines.This report will be of interest to policy makers, health professionals and researchers in the field, as well as to the broader community.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with coronary heart disease: further perspectives on health status and treatment

'Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with coronary heart disease: further perspectives on health status and treatment' builds on existing information on disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians in the health status and treatment of coronary heart disease. It is the first study of this scale to analyse data on Indigenous Australians in four key areas: incidence of major coronary events; case fatality from major coronary events; use of coronary procedures in hospital; case complexity in hospital. This new information enables us to build a more complete picture of the coronary heart disease burden among Indigenous Australians, and also furthers our knowledge of disparities in treatment of coronary heart disease in relation to need. This report will be of interest to policy makers, health professionals and researchers in the field, as well as to the broader community.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with coronary heart disease (summary booklet): further perspectives on health status and treatment

This summary presents the key points detailed in 'Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with coronary heart disease: further perspectives on health status and treatment'. That report builds on existing information on disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians in the health status and treatment of coronary heart disease. New information on the incidence of major coronary events, case fatality, use of coronary procedures in hospital and case complexity in hospital has built a more complete picture of the coronary heart disease burden among Indigenous Australians. This summary will be of interest to those policy makers and health professionals who prefer an overview of the main points, as well as to the broader community.

Socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular disease in Australia

It has been well established in Australia that people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged experience higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality than other Australians. Further, there is evidence that the differential has widened, with relative CVD mortality inequality between Australians from the most disadvantaged areas and those from the least disadvantaged areas being higher in recent years than it was in the mid-1980s. A similar trend of widening socioeconomic inequalities in CVD mortality has also been observed in other OECD countries.This bulletin examines inequalities in CVD mortality over the 10-year period from 1992 to 2002 and hospitalisations over the period 1996-97 to 2003-04 for people aged 25-74 years to try to answer key questions in relation to mortality and significant morbidity requiring hospitalisation.

How we manage stroke in Australia

How we manage stroke in Australia presents a comprehensive picture of the impact of stroke on patient, their carers, the heath system and aged care services. It brings together the latest Australian data on the various phases of the management of people with stroke across the continuum of care. Where possible, it compares current practice to clinical guidelines for best practice in the care of stroke patients. It identifies improvements in care, areas where more needs to be done and gaps in our knowledge.

Living dangerously, Australians with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease

This bulletin provides a summary of the risk factor profile of Australian adults - focusing on risk factors for cardiovascular disease - both individually and in combination. Using self-reported data collected in the Australian Bureau of Statistics' 2001 National Health Survey, the nine risk factors examined are smoking, physical activity, low fruit consumption, low vegetable consumption, risky alcohol consumption, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, obesity and diabetes. The prevalence of multiple risk factors is described according to age, sex and socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease in order to identify population groups most at risk.

The relationship between overweight, obesity and cardiovascular disease: a literature review prepared for the National Heart Foundation Australia

The Relationship Between Overweight, Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease presents the latest evidence linking excess body weight with cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and their associated risk factors. Published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the National Heart Foundation of Australia, this report is a valuable resource for the broader community as well as policy makers, health professionals and researchers interested in cardiovascular health.

Australian health measurement survey: report on the pilot test

Data about biomedical risk factors in the population are an important component of national public health information. Data about high blood pressure and levels of blood components are very relevant to priority health problems such as coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, high blood cholesterol and other chronic disorders that have significant health, social and economic impact. In May 2002, the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council endorsed the conduct of a pilot test of the proposed Australian Health Measurement Survey. This information paper describes the methods used in the pilot test run in early 2003 and documents key lessons learnt in conducting the pilot.

Health care expenditure on cardiovascular diseases 2000-01

This report presents summary data of allocated health expenditure collected by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Rheumatic heart disease: all but forgotten in Australia except among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

This bulletin describes the population patterns of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Australia today using data obtained from regional registers and national databases.

Data set specification, acute coronary syndrome (clinical),: National Health Data Dictionary version 12 supplement

Data Set Specifications (DSS) are metadata sets that are not mandated for collection but are recommended as best practice. It is recommended that, if collecting data for purposes of primary patient care, planning or analysis, the entire DDS be collected. This metadata set is primarily concerned with the clinical use of acute coronary syndrome data. While the use of this standard is voluntary, it should be used by health and health-related establishments that create, use or maintain, records on health care clients. The Acute Coronary Syndrome (Clinical) DSS aims to ensure national consistency in relation to defining, monitoring and recording information on patients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome.

Heart, stroke and vascular diseases, Australian facts 2004

This publication presents the latest facts and figures on cardiovascular disease and its impact on the Australian community. It is the third report in a series by the National Centre for Monitoring Cardiovascular Disease. Published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the National Heart Foundation of Australia, this is a comprehensive source of information covering patterns of cardiovascular health and illness among Australians, their associated risk factors, treatment and management of the disease. This valuable compilation will be relevant to the broader community as well as policy makers, health professionals and researchers interested in cardiovascular health.

Physical activity, diet and body weight: results from the 2001 National Health Survey

This data briefing explores self-reported leisure-time physical activity and selected dietary behaviours collected in the 2001 National Health survey and analyses how they vary by weight status for adults aged 20 years and over.

Apparent consumption of nutrients, Australia 1997-98

This report estimates the nutrient content in the food supply, from which assessments can be made as to whether the nutrients available for consumption in Australia are adequate to meet the needs of the population. Current until 14 April 2005.

Health, wellbeing and body weight: characteristics of overweight and obesity in Australia, 2001

Overweight, and in particular obesity, is known to be associated with numerous adverse health conditions. This bulletin, which complements other work produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on overweight and obesity, investigates the relationship between this growing public health problem and a number of health-related characteristics using national estimates from the 2001 National Health Survey.

Are all Australians gaining weight?: differentials in overweight and obesity among adults, 1989-90 to 2001

This bulletin presents the results of analyses of the prevalence of overweight and obesity for a range of different subgroups of Australian adults over the period 1989-90 to 2001. These comparisons between subgroups are referred to as differentials. The characteristics examined include basic demographic details (age and sex), place of residence, socioeconomic status, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and ethnicity.

Secondary prevention and rehabilitation after coronary events or stroke: a review of monitoring issues

Cardiovascular disease poses a heavy burden on the health of Australians. Coronary heart disease and stroke are its most costly manifestations, in terms of deaths, disability and health system costs. Risk factors for heart disease and stroke remain very common among Australians, including those with established cardiovascular disease. For the latter in particular, it is imperative to try and prevent further cardiovascular events. This paper identifies gaps and deficiencies in our knowledge in relation to secondary prevention and rehabilitation after coronary heart disease and stroke, including incidence, interventions and outcomes at a national level and suggests possible solutions.

A growing problem: trends and patterns in overweight and obesity among adults in Australia, 1980 to 2001

This bulletin documents the evidence from national cross-sectional surveys of overweight and obesity among adults in Australia during the past two decades, puts the size of the problem in perspective, and compares the prevalence in Australia with the prevalence in other developed countries. Future bulletins will focus on trends by socio-demographic and economic factors, and on the impact of overweight and obesity in Australia in terms of a number of health-related measures.

Coronary revascularisation in Australia, 2000

Heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Australia, responsible for 20% of deaths in 2000. The most common form of heart disease affecting Australians is coronary heart disease. This involves blockages in the heart's own blood supply, the coronary arteries, by abnormal build-ups known as plaques. Two main procedures can be used to overcome the blockages by either reducing or bypassing them. Jointly known as coronary revascularisation procedures, they are percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This bulletin examines current patterns in coronary revascularisation procedures and explores reason for their marked increase over the last decade. To this end, data presented in this bulletin are drawn from two data sources: the national registers on cardiac surgery and coronary angioplasty (collected by calendar year) and the AIHW's National Hospital Morbidity Database (collected by financial year). The latest information available from the national registers was 1999, so data are supplemented by hospital morbidity data and reported in calendar year for comparative purposes.

Heart failure. . . what of the future?

This bulletin begins with an assessment of what we need to know to monitor heart failure effectively in Australia. This is followed by a summary of what we already know as a result of analysing existing national data sets and includes a discussion of issues in monitoring heart failure, particularly in relation to the interpretation of data from existing sources. International comparisons are then made, and the bulletin concludes with a discussion of possible future trends in the incidence and prevalence of heart failure in Australia.

Cardiac surgery in Australia 1999

This report aims to provide details of cardiac surgery for acquired conditions performed in Australia in 1999. It covers patterns and trends in the use of cardiac surgery procedures for acquired conditions, and associated mortality.

The Active Australia Survey: a guide and manual for implementation, analysis and reporting

The Active Australia Survey is designed to measure participation in leisure-time physical activity and to assess knowledge of current public health measures about the health benefits of physical activity. It offers a short and reliable set of questions that can be easily implemented via computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) techniques or in face-to-face interviews.This manual is designed to provide an overview of the survey. It includes a copy of the survey, an implementation guide with instructions for interviewers, a guide to the measures that can be derived from the survey data, information on how these measures are calculated and examples of how they are usually reported. It also provides background information on the development of the survey and an example of CATI coding.

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