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Lymphoma in Australia

Lymphoma incorporates ICD-10 cancer codes C81 (Hodgkin’s disease), C82 (follicular non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma), C83 (diffuse non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma), C84 (peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas) and C85–C86 (other and unspecified types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma).


Estimated number of new cases of lymphoma diagnosed in 2017

6,232 = Male icon PNG 3,574 males + Female icon PNG 2,658 females


lymphoma-percent-all-new-cases

Estimated % of all new cancer cases diagnosed in 2017

4.6%


Estimated number of deaths from lymphoma in 2017

1,481 = Male icon PNG 863 males + Female icon PNG 618 females


lymphoma-percent-all-deaths

Estimated % of all deaths from cancer in 2017

3.1%


76-in-100

Chance of surviving at least 5 years (2009–2013)

76%


crowd

People living with lymphoma at the end of 2012 (diagnosed in the 5 year period 2008 to 2012)

20,200


New cases of lymphoma

Lymphoma was the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia in 2013. It is estimated that it will remain the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer in 2017.

In 2013, there were 5,589 new cases of lymphoma diagnosed in Australia (3,151 males and 2,438 females). In 2017, it is estimated that 6,232 new cases of lymphoma will be diagnosed in Australia (3,574 males and 2,658 females).

In 2013, the age-standardised incidence rate was 22 cases per 100,000 persons (26 for males and 18 for females). In 2017, it is estimated that the age-standardised incidence rate will be 22 cases per 100,000 persons (27 for males and 18 for females). It is expected the incidence rate of lymphoma will generally increase with age for males, and increase with age until 75–79 in females, before decreasing in the older age groups (Figure 1).

In 2017, it is estimated that the risk of an individual being diagnosed with lymphoma by their 85th birthday will be 1 in 36 (1 in 30 males and 1 in 45 females).

The number of new cases of lymphoma diagnosed increased from 1,918 (1,032 males and 886 females) in 1982 to 5,589 in 2013. Over the same period, the age-standardised incidence rate increased from 15 cases per 100,000 persons (17 for males and 13 for females) in 1982 to 22 cases per 100,000 persons in 2013 (Figure 2).

Deaths from lymphoma

In 2014, lymphoma was the 9th leading cause of cancer death in Australia. It is estimated that it will become the 12th most common cause of death from cancer in 2017.

In 2014, there were 1,598 deaths from lymphoma in Australia (907 males and 691 females). In 2017, it is estimated that this will decrease to 1,481 deaths (863 males and 618 females).

In 2014, the age-standardised mortality rate was 5.8 deaths per 100,000 persons (7.4 for males and 4.6 for females). In 2017, it is estimated that the age-standardised mortality rate will decrease to 4.9 deaths per 100,000 persons (6.4 for males and 3.7 for females). The mortality rate of lymphoma will generally increase with age (Figure 1).

In 2017, it is estimated that the risk of an individual dying from lymphoma by their 85th birthday will be 1 in 146 (1 in 114 males and 1 in 196 females).

The number of deaths from lymphoma increased from 662 (378 males and 284 females) in 1968 to 1,598 in 2014. Over the same period, the age-standardised mortality rate increased from 7.0 deaths per 100,000 persons (8.5 for males and 5.7 for females) in 1968 to 9.3 deaths per 100,000 persons in 1997 before decreasing to 5.8 deaths per 100,000 in 2014 (Figure 2).

Figure 1: Estimated age-specific incidence and mortality rates for lymphoma, by sex, 2017

This line chart presents the estimated age-specific incidence (solid line) and mortality (dashed line) rates of cancer name for males (blue), females (purple) and persons (green) in 2017. The age-specific incidence and mortality rates are shown on the primary (left) y-axis, with 5-year age groups from ages 0–4 to 85+ shown on the x-axis.

Source: AIHW analysis of the Australian Cancer Database and AIHW National Mortality Dataset (see source table 1).

Figure 2: Age-standardised incidence rates for lymphoma 1982–2013 and age-standardised mortality rates for lymphoma 1968–2014, by sex

This line chart presents the estimated age-standardised incidence (solid line) and mortality (dashed line) rates (per 100,000) of cancer name for males (blue), females (purple) and persons (green) over the period 1982–2013 for incidence and 1968–2014 for mortality. The age standardised incidence and mortality rates, expressed per 100,000 persons, are shown on the primary (left) y-axis. Years from 1968 to 2014 are presented on the x-axis.

Source: AIHW analysis of the Australian Cancer Database and AIHW National Mortality Dataset (see source table 2).

Survival from lymphoma

In 2009–2013, individuals diagnosed with lymphoma had a 76% chance (75% for males and 77% for females) of surviving for 5 years compared to their counterparts in the general Australian population.

Between 1984–1988 and 2009–2013, 5-year relative survival from lymphoma improved from 52% to 76%.

Figure 3: 5-year relative survival from lymphoma, 1983–1987 to 2008–2012

This line chart presents 5-year relative survival at diagnosis for cancer name by males, females and persons over the period 1984–1988 to 2009–2013. The percentage of survival is presented on the y-axis.

Source: AIHW analysis of the Australian Cancer Database and AIHW National Mortality Dataset (see source table 3).

Survivorship population for lymphoma

The survivorship population is measured using prevalence data. Prevalence refers to the number of people alive who have previously been diagnosed with lymphoma.

The prevalence for 1, 5 and 31 years given below are the number of people living with lymphoma cancer at the end of 2012 who had been diagnosed in the preceding 1, 5 and 31 years respectively.

At the end of 2012, there were 5,097 people living who had been diagnosed with lymphoma that year, 20,200 people who had been diagnosed with lymphoma in the previous 5 years (from 2008 to 2012) and 50,750 people who had been diagnosed with lymphoma in the previous 31 years (from 1982 to 2012).


Source tables

Source table 1: Estimated age-specific incidence and mortality rates (per 100,000) for lymphoma, by sex, 2017
Age group (years) Incidence rate Mortality rate
Males Females Persons Males Females Persons
0–4 1.1 0.5 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.0
5–9 2.4 0.9 1.7 0.1 0.1 0.1
10–14 2.9 1.9 2.4 0.0 0.0 0.0
15–19 6.4 5.4 5.9 0.1 0.3 0.2
20–24 6.0 4.7 5.4 0.2 0.6 0.4
25–29 7.7 5.5 6.6 0.5 0.5 0.5
30–34 8.1 6.2 7.1 0.1 0.2 0.2
35–39 10.9 8.0 9.5 0.5 0.8 0.6
40–44 12.4 11.0 11.7 1.1 0.6 0.8
45–49 19.9 15.4 17.6 1.8 1.0 1.4
50–54 26.5 22.1 24.3 3.9 2.7 3.3
55–59 41.1 27.9 34.4 7.1 4.0 5.5
60–64 57.5 40.4 48.9 11.7 5.8 8.7
65–69 85.2 57.1 71.1 20.8 10.8 15.7
70–74 102.3 69.1 85.4 29.4 17.2 23.2
75–79 124.2 92.7 107.5 49.4 32.3 40.4
80–84 137.4 90.5 110.9 74.7 51.8 61.8
85+ 151.5 84.9 108.5 119.2 69.9 87.6
Source table 2: Age-standardised incidence rates (per 100,000) for lymphoma 1982–2013 and age-standardised mortality rates (per 100,000) for lymphoma 1968–2014, by sex.
Year Incidence rate Mortality rate
Males Females Persons Males Females Persons
1968 . . . . . . 8.5 5.7 7.0
1969 . . . . . . 8.2 5.6 6.7
1970 . . . . . . 9.0 5.9 7.3
1971 . . . . . . 8.7 5.1 6.7
1972 . . . . . . 8.5 5.6 6.9
1973 . . . . . . 8.2 5.9 6.9
1974 . . . . . . 7.4 6.0 6.6
1975 . . . . . . 8.1 5.7 6.7
1976 . . . . . . 7.5 5.1 6.2
1977 . . . . . . 7.6 5.2 6.3
1978 . . . . . . 8.4 5.6 6.8
1979 . . . . . . 8.4 5.6 6.8
1980 . . . . . . 8.2 6.1 7.0
1981 . . . . . . 8.2 6.1 7.1
1982 17.4 12.9 14.9 9.1 6.0 7.4
1983 16.8 12.7 14.6 9.0 6.4 7.5
1984 17.8 13.1 15.1 8.5 5.9 7.0
1985 18.2 12.5 15.0 8.8 6.7 7.6
1986 18.3 12.7 15.2 10.2 6.5 8.1
1987 19.9 14.0 16.5 9.3 6.5 7.8
1988 19.7 13.5 16.2 10.4 6.6 8.2
1989 20.2 14.3 16.9 11.0 6.6 8.5
1990 21.6 14.2 17.6 10.4 6.8 8.4
1991 21.6 15.0 17.9 10.3 7.1 8.5
1992 22.8 16.0 19.0 10.7 7.3 8.7
1993 22.9 15.4 18.9 11.1 7.3 9.0
1994 22.1 16.2 18.9 11.5 7.2 9.2
1995 21.5 16.8 19.0 10.2 7.8 8.9
1996 24.1 16.9 20.1 10.0 7.5 8.6
1997 23.5 17.3 20.0 11.4 7.8 9.3
1998 23.0 17.1 19.8 10.1 7.8 8.8
1999 23.8 17.4 20.3 10.1 7.2 8.5
2000 24.2 17.9 20.8 10.9 7.3 8.9
2001 24.0 17.2 20.3 9.5 6.8 8.0
2002 24.9 18.1 21.2 10.1 6.6 8.1
2003 25.2 17.5 21.1 9.5 6.1 7.6
2004 25.0 17.8 21.1 8.8 6.4 7.5
2005 24.9 19.0 21.7 8.2 5.8 6.9
2006 24.9 17.7 21.1 8.4 5.4 6.8
2007 24.6 18.3 21.3 8.0 5.0 6.4
2008 25.0 17.8 21.2 8.0 5.0 6.3
2009 25.5 18.2 21.6 7.2 4.8 5.9
2010 26.2 18.2 22.0 7.6 4.4 5.9
2011 26.8 18.1 22.3 7.3 4.6 5.8
2012 27.8 18.8 23.0 7.5 4.2 5.7
2013 26.1 18.4 22.0 7.6 4.6 5.9
2014 . . . . . . 7.4 4.6 5.8
Source table 3: 5-year relative survival from lymphoma, by sex, 1984–1988 to 2009–2013
Year Males Females Persons
1984–1988 52.0 51.4 51.7
1989–1993 52.5 55.7 53.9
1994–1998 56.3 56.8 56.5
1999–2003 62.1 63.7 62.9
2004–2008 69.6 70.5 70.0
2009–2013 75.1 76.9 75.9

Data notes

International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems Version 10 (ICD-10)

Cancer is classified by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems Version 10 (ICD-10). This is a statistical classification, published by the World Health Organization, in which each morbid condition is assigned a unique code according to established criteria.

Estimations

Future estimations for incidence and mortality are a mathematical extrapolation of past trends. They assume that the most recent trends will continue into the future, and are intended to illustrate future changes that might reasonably be expected to occur if the stated assumptions continue to apply over the estimated period. Actual future cancer incidence and mortality rates may vary from these estimations. For instance, new screening programs may increase the detection of new cancer cases; new vaccination programs may decrease the risk of developing cancer; and improvements in treatment options may decrease mortality rates.

Incidence

Cancer incidence indicates the number of new cancers diagnosed during a specified time period (usually one year).

The 2013 national incidence counts include estimates for NSW because the actual data were not available. Note that actual data for the Australian Capital Territory do not include cases identified from death certificates.

The 2017 estimates are based on 2004–13 incidence data. Due to rounding of these estimates, male and female incidence may not sum to person incidence.

Mortality

Cancer mortality refers to the number of deaths occurring during a specified time period (usually one year) for which the underlying cause of death is cancer.

The 2017 estimates are based on mortality data up to 2013. Joinpoint analysis was used on the longest time series of age-standardised rates available to determine the starting year of the most recent trend.

Prevalence

Prevalence of cancer refers to the number of people alive with a prior diagnosis of cancer at a given time. It is distinct from incidence, which is the number of new cancers diagnosed within a given period of time. The longest period for which it is possible to calculate prevalence using the available national data (from 1982 to 2012) is currently 31 years so this is used to provide an estimate of the ‘total’ prevalence of cancer as at the end of 2012, noting that people diagnosed with cancer before 1982 aren’t included.

Age standardised rates

Incidence and mortality rates expressed per 100,000 population are age-standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.