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Mortality projections presented in this report have recently been revised using more recent data and are presented in the report Cancer mortality trends and projections: 2014 to 2025. In the process of updating the projections, changes have been made to the underlying models used in this report. Readers should therefore use the relevant mortality projections presented in the Cancer mortality trends and projections: 2014 to 2025 report instead.

This Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014 appendix provides summary pages on the incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence statistics for selected cancers that were commonly diagnosed or were common causes of cancer deaths.

Actual cancer incidence data for 1982-2011 and estimates for 2012-2016 (based on 2002-2011 incidence data) are presented. Actual cancer mortality data for 1982-2012 and estimates for 2013-2016 (based on 2002-2012 mortality data) are presented (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014.

Data for the figures presented in this appendix are in online supplementary tables.

Download publication PDF or order a printed copy Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014.

All cancers combined (C00-C97, D45, D46, D47.1, D47.3)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing the sun Square icon showing a radiation symbol Square icon showing a stethoscope Square icon showing an ovum and three sperm Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke  

Table B1(a): Incidence and mortality of all cancers combined
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 67,117 51,594 118,711 24,341 18,698 43,039
Crude rate 603.7 459.8 531.4 215.2 163.8 189.4
ASR 579.7 403.6 484.1 210.6 133.0 166.8
Risk to age 75 1 in 3 1 in 4 1 in 3 1 in 9 1 in 13 1 in 11
Risk to age 85 1 in 2 1 in 3 1 in 2 1 in 4 1 in 6 1 in 5
Mean age 67.0 65.0 66.1 73.1 73.1 73.1
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 68,260 55,660 123,920 26,010 19,770 45,780
2015 69,790 57,010 126,800 26,470 20,100 46,570
2016 72,050 58,420 130,470 26,950 20,430 47,380

Figure B1(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of all cancers combined, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of all cancers in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B1(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of all cancers combined, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of all cancers in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. For incidence data, ICD-10 C44 codes that indicate a basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin are not included. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B1(b): Survival and prevalence of all cancers combined(a)
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(b)
1-year prevalence 57,171 42,121 98,292
5-year prevalence 206,437 164,037 370,474
Relative survival in 2007-2011(c)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 80.6 81.6 81.0
95% confidence interval 80.4-80.7 81.5-81.8 80.9-81.2
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 66.1 67.5 66.7
95% confidence interval 65.9-66.3 67.3-67.7 66.5-66.8
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 80.0 80.9 80.4
95% confidence interval 79.8-80.3 80.7-81.2 80.3-80.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 89.9 92.1 91.0
95% confidence interval 89.7-90.2 91.8-92.3 90.8-91.2

Figure B1(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from all cancers combined, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of all cancers from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates over 20 years steadily drop for relative survival at diagnosis, while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. For survival and prevalence data, those ICD-10 C44 codes that indicate a basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin are not included.
  2. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  3. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Acute myeloid leukaemia (C92.0, C92.3-C92.5, C93.0, C94.0, C94.2, C94.4, C94.5)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette

Table B2(a): Incidence and mortality of acute myeloid leukaemia
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)  
Number 527 386 913 465 348 813
Crude rate 4.7 3.4 4.1 4.1 3.0 3.6
ASR 4.7 3.0 3.8 4.0 2.6 3.2
Risk to age 75 1 in 328 1 in 478 1 in 390 1 in 444 1 in 608 1 in 514
Risk to age 85 1 in 174 1 in 264 1 in 212 1 in 174 1 in 272 1 in 216
Mean age 63.3 65.4 64.2 72.1 71.5 71.9
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 580 440 1,020 545 375 920
2015 595 450 1,050 565 385 950
2016 610 460 1,070 585 395 980

Figure B2(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of acute myeloid leukaemia, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of acute myeloid leukaemia in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B2(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of acute myeloid leukaemia, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of acute myeloid leukaemia in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B2(b): Survival and prevalence of acute myeloid leukaemia


Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 310 245 555
5-year prevalence 860 700 1,560
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 40.1 42.0 40.9
95% confidence interval 37.9-42.2 39.5-44.4 39.3-42.5
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 23.4 26.1 24.5
95% confidence interval 21.6-25.2 24.0-28.2 23.2-25.9
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 55.7 60.1 57.7
95% confidence interval 50.8-60.6 55.2-65.0 54.2-61.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 87.6 91.1 89.3
95% confidence interval 84.2-91.0 88.3-93.9 87.1-91.5

Figure B2(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from acute myeloid leukaemia, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of acute myeloid leukaemia from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates steeply drop in the first year, then plateau over 19 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Anal cancer (C21)

Table B3(a): Incidence and mortality of anal cancer


Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)
Number 151 218 369 32 39 71
Crude rate 1.4 1.9 1.7 0.3 0.3 0.3
ASR 1.3 1.7 1.5 0.3 0.3 0.3
Risk to age 75 1 in 961 1 in 693 1 in 804 1 in 4,842 1 in 4,000 1 in 4,375
Risk to age 85 1 in 618 1 in 479 1 in 538 1 in 3,465 1 in 3,071 1 in 3,243
Mean age 64.7 64.7 64.7 66.1 63.8 64.8
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)  
2014 155 230 385 40 40 80
2015 160 235 395 40 40 80
2016 165 245 405 45 40 85

Figure B3(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(a,b) of anal cancer, 1982–2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of cancer of the anus in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B3(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of anal cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of cancer of the anus in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B3(b): Survival and prevalence of anal cancer


Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 133 195 328
5-year prevalence 474 694 1,168
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 86.4 89.6 88.3
95% confidence interval 83.2-89.1 87.2-91.6 86.4-89.9
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 58.9 68.6 64.5
95% confidence interval 54.4-63.2 65.0-72.1 61.7-67.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 65.1 74.4 70.6
95% confidence interval 59.0-71.2 70.2-78.5 67.1-74.0
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 82.9 88.8 86.5
95% confidence interval 77.0-88.8 84.7-93.0 83.0-89.9

Figure B3(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from anal cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

figure3c
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Bladder cancer (C67)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a stethoscope Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke

Table B4(a): Incidence and mortality of bladder cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)  
Number 1,806 598 2,404 707 331 1,038
Crude rate 16.2 5.3 10.8 6.3 2.9 4.6
ASR 16.2 4.3 9.6 6.3 2.1 3.9
Risk to age 75 1 in 115 1 in 410 1 in 180 1 in 386 1 in 1,120 1 in 578
Risk to age 85 1 in 43 1 in 166 1 in 71 1 in 125 1 in 347 1 in 191
Mean age 74.4 76.1 74.8 77.9 80.3 78.6
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 2,060 675 2,730 780 335 1,115
2015 2,110 690 2,800 800 340 1,140
2016 2,170 705 2,880 815 350 1,165

Figure B4(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of bladder cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of cancer of the bladder in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B4(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of bladder cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of cancer of the bladder in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B4(b): Survival and prevalence of bladder cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)  
1-year prevalence 1,498 468 1,966
5-year prevalence 5,241 1,498 6,739
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 78.8 68.9 76.4
95% confidence interval 77.8-79.8 66.9-70.8 75.5-77.3
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 55.2 46.8 53.1
95% confidence interval 53.8-56.5 44.5-49.0 51.9-54.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 66.9 66.6 66.8
95% confidence interval 64.9-68.8 63.1-70.1 65.1-68.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 84.0 86.7 84.7
95% confidence interval 82.1-86.0 83.6-89.9 83.0-86.3

Figure B4(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from bladder cancer, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of bladder cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Brain cancer (C71)

Table B5(a): Incidence and mortality of brain cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)
Number 1,010 714 1,724 737 504 1,241
Crude rate 9.1 6.4 7.7 6.5 4.4 5.5
ASR 8.8 5.8 7.3 6.2 3.9 5.0
Risk to age 75 1 in 145 1 in 220 1 in 175 1 in 201 1 in 327 1 in 249
Risk to age 85 1 in 96 1 in 149 1 in 118 1 in 127 1 in 206 1 in 159
Mean age 58.7 58.7 58.7 62.3 64.3 63.1
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)  
2014 1,060 740 1,800 790 540 1,330
2015 1,090 755 1,850 805 550 1,355
2016 1,120 775 1,900 825 560 1,385

Figure B5(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of brain cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of cancer of the brain in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B5(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of brain cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of cancer of the brain in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B5(b): Survival and prevalence of brain cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)  
1-year prevalence 677 459 1,136
5-year prevalence 1,591 1,165 2,756
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 49.4 47.8 48.7
95% confidence interval 47.8-50.9 45.9-49.7 47.5-49.9
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 20.5 23.2 21.6
95% confidence interval 19.2-21.7 21.7-24.8 20.7-22.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 38.7 47.4 42.3
95% confidence interval 34.0-43.4 42.7-52.1 38.9-45.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 74.6 83.1 78.4
95% confidence interval 70.9-78.3 79.8-86.4 75.9-80.9

Figure B5(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from brain cancer, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of brain cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop significantly in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Breast cancer (C50)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a radiation symbol Square icon showing an ovum and three sperm

Table B6(a): Incidence and mortality of breast cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)  
Number 103 14,465 14,568 24 2,795 2,819
Crude rate 0.9 128.9 65.2 0.2 24.5 12.4
ASR 0.9 116.0 60.2 0.2 20.6 11.0
Risk to age 75 1 in 1,477 1 in 11 1 in 21 1 in 9,098 1 in 67 1 in 131
Risk to age 85 1 in 917 1 in 8 1 in 15 1 in 3,255 1 in 40 1 in 75
Mean age 66.4 61.3 61.3 71.8 68.8 68.8
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 140 15,270 15,410 25 3,000 3,025
2015 145 15,600 15,740 25 3,040 3,065
2016 150 15,930 16,080 25 3,080 3,105

Figure B6(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of breast cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of breast cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B6(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of breast cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of breast cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B6(b): Survival and prevalence of breast cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 107 13,428 13,535
5-year prevalence 445 58,955 59,400
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 99.4 97.9 97.9
95% confidence interval 97.1100.8 97.7-98.0 97.7-98.0
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 86.4 89.6 89.6
95% confidence interval 81.5-90.8 89.3-89.9 89.2-89.9
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 85.5 90.0 89.9
95% confidence interval 80.7-90.3 89.7-90.3 89.6-90.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 90.0 93.2 93.2
95% confidence interval 84.3-95.6 92.9-93.5 92.9-93.5

Figure B6(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from breast cancer in females, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of breast cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years. Neither drop below 70% over a 20-year period.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Cervical cancer (C53)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury

Table B7(a): Incidence and mortality of cervical cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number .. 801 801 .. 226 226
Crude rate .. 7.1 .. .. 2.0 ..
ASR .. 6.9 .. .. 1.8 ..
Risk to age 75 .. 1 in 193 .. .. 1 in 828 ..
Risk to age 85 .. 1 in 162 .. .. 1 in 496 ..
Mean age .. 48.7 .. .. 63.0 ..
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 .. 865 865 .. 245 245
2015 .. 885 885 .. 250 250
2016 .. 905 905 .. 255 255

Figure B7(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of cervical cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B7(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of cervical cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of cervical cancer in females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B7(b): Survival and prevalence of cervical cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence .. 684 684
5-year prevalence .. 2,903 2,903
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) .. 87.4 87.4
95% confidence interval .. 86.2-88.5 86.2-88.5
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) .. 71.9 71.9
95% confidence interval .. 70.2-73.4 70.2-73.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) .. 80.8 80.8
95% confidence interval .. 79.2-82.3 79.2-82.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) .. 94.6 94.6
95% confidence interval .. 93.6-95.7 93.6-95.7

Figure B7(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from cervical cancer, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of cervical cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (C91.1)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a radiation symbol

Table B8(a): Incidence and mortality (2012) of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)  
Number 722 452 1,174 203 139 342
Crude rate 6.5 4.0 5.3 1.8 1.2 1.5
ASR 6.2 3.4 4.7 1.8 0.9 1.3
Risk to age 75 1 in 211 1 in 386 1 in 273 1 in 1,461 1 in 3,843 1 in 2,128
Risk to age 85 1 in 117 1 in 212 1 in 153 1 in 413 1 in 895 1 in 581
Mean age 68.6 72.1 70.0 78.5 82.0 79.9
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 790 510 1,300 230 145 375
2015 805 520 1,330 240 145 385
2016 825 535 1,360 245 150 395

Figure B8(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B8(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B8(b): Survival and prevalence of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 579 371 950
5-year prevalence 2,559 1,587 4,146
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 93.1 93.7 93.3
95% confidence interval 92.0-94.2 92.2-94.9 92.4-94.2
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 74.8 79.8 76.7
95% confidence interval 72.8-76.8 77.3-82.2 75.1-78.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 75.8 81.6 78.0
95% confidence interval 73.5-78.1 79.0-84.2 76.3-79.7
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 73.0 81.8 76.6
95% confidence interval 69.8-76.2 78.5-85.1 74.3-78.9

Figure B8(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Colorectal cancer (C18-C20)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a stethoscope

Table B9(a): Incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 8,351 6,800 15,151 2,208 1,772 3,980
Crude rate 75.1 60.6 67.8 19.5 15.5 17.5
ASR 72.8 51.5 61.5 19.1 12.4 15.4
Risk to age 75 1 in 19 1 in 28 1 in 23 1 in 91 1 in 145 1 in 112
Risk to age 85 1 in 10 1 in 15 1 in 12 1 in 38 1 in 61 1 in 48
Mean age 69.1 70.6 69.8 72.3 74.6 73.3
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 9,290 7,340 16,640 2,210 1,910 4,120
2015 9,550 7,520 17,070 2,190 1,930 4,120
2016 9,810 7,710 17,520 2,170 1,950 4,120

Figure B9(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of colorectal cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B9(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of colorectal cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of colorectal cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B9(b): Survival and prevalence of colorectal cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 6,835 5,495 12,330
5-year prevalence 26,700 21,896 48,596
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 85.7 84.1 85.0
95% confidence interval 85.3-86.1 83.6-84.6 84.7-85.3
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 66.4 67.4 66.9
95% confidence interval 65.8-67.0 66.7-68.1 66.4-67.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 75.3 78.5 76.7
95% confidence interval 74.6-76.0 77.8-79.3 76.2-77.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 90.1 92.7 91.3
95% confidence interval 89.4-90.9 91.9-93.4 90.8-91.8

Figure B9(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from colorectal cancer, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of colorectal cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts (C23-C24)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a DNA string

Table B10(a): Incidence and mortality of cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts>
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 335 436 771 99 155 254
Crude rate 3.0 3.9 3.5 0.9 1.4 1.1
ASR 3.0 3.2 3.1 0.9 1.1 1.0
Risk to age 75 1 in 523 1 in 499 1 in 511 1 in 2,654 1 in 1,755 1 in 2,107
Risk to age 85 1 in 243 1 in 215 1 in 227 1 in 823 1 in 649 719
Mean age 72.5 73.0 72.8 75.5 1 in 76.7 1 in 76.3
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 355 440 795 110 150 260
2015 365 450 815 115 145 260
2016 380 460 840 120 145 265

Figure B10(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of cancer of gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B10(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of cancer of gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011 and AIHW NMD.

Table B10(b): Survival and prevalence of cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 220 224 444
5-year prevalence 533 535 1,068
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 49.5 39.3 43.9
95% confidence interval 46.8-52.2 36.9-41.7 42.1-45.8
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 20.3 17.0 18.5
95% confidence interval 18.1-22.7 15.2-19.0 17.1-20.1
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 37.7 40.4 39.1
95% confidence interval 28.6-46.9 31.9-48.9 32.9-45.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 81.0 82.9 82.0
95% confidence interval 73.4-88.6 76.3-89.5 77.1-87.0

Figure B10(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of cancer of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop sharply in the first two years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Hodgkin lymphoma (C81)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat

Table B11(a): Incidence and mortality of Hodgkin lymphoma
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 338 268 606 55 23 78
Crude rate 3.0 2.4 2.7 0.5 0.2 0.3
ASR 3.0 2.3 2.7 0.5 0.2 0.3
Risk to age 75 1 in 437 1 in 596 1 in 505 1 in 3,791 1 in 11,785 1 in 5,784
Risk to age 85 1 in 361 1 in 479 1 in 412 1 in 1,546 1 in 5,655 1 in 2,533
Mean age 43.4 42.4 43.0 71.3 64.8 69.4

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 335 265 605 15 15 30
2015 345 270 615 15 15 30
2016 350 275 630 15 15 30

Figure B11(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of Hodgkin lymphoma, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of Hodgkin lymphoma in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B11(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of Hodgkin lymphoma, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of Hodgkin lymphoma in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B11(b): Survival and prevalence of Hodgkin lymphoma
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 281 251 532
5-year prevalence 1,281 1,087 2,368

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 93.8 92.9 93.4
95% confidence interval 92.3-95.1 91.2-94.4 92.3-94.4
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 87.3 87.1 87.2
95% confidence interval 85.1-89.2 84.8-89.1 85.7-88.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 91.9 92.9 92.4
95% confidence interval 90.3-93.6 91.3-94.5 91.2-93.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 94.9 95.7 95.3
95% confidence interval 93.4-96.4 94.2-97.1 94.2-96.3

Figure B11(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from Hodgkin lymphoma, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of Hodgkin lymphoma from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years. Neither drop below 70% over a 20-year period.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Kidney cancer (C64)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a stethoscope Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke

Table B12(a): Incidence and mortality of kidney cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 1,861 985 2,847 574 333 907
Crude rate 16.7 8.8 12.7 5.1 2.9 4.0
ASR 16.0 7.7 11.7 4.9 2.3 3.5
Risk to age 75 1 in 78 1 in 159 1 in 105 1 in 318 1 in 855 1 in 466
Risk to age 85 1 in 51 1 in 104 1 in 69 1 in 156 1 in 314 1 in 212
Mean age 63.5 64.7 63.9 70.5 76.2 72.6

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 2,000 1,060 3,060 625 355 980
2015 2,060 1,080 3,150 635 360 995
2016 2,120 1,110 3,230 650 365 1,015

Figure B12(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of kidney cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of kidney cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B12(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of kidney cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of kidney cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B12(b): Survival and prevalence of kidney cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 1,528 844 2,372
5-year prevalence 6,291 3,336 9,627

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 86.0 85.1 85.7
95% confidence interval 85.1-86.8 83.9-86.2 85.0-86.3
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 72.9 74.2 73.4
95% confidence interval 71.7-74.1 72.6-75.7 72.4-74.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 82.8 85.6 83.8
95% confidence interval 81.6-84.1 84.1-87.1 82.8-84.8
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 88.3 91.3 89.4
95% confidence interval 86.8-89.7 89.7-92.9 88.3-90.5

Figure B12(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from kidney cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of kidney cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Laryngeal cancer (C32)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat

Table B13(a): Incidence and mortality of laryngeal cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 526 64 590 184 24 208
Crude rate 4.7 0.6 2.6 1.6 0.2 0.9
ASR 4.5 0.5 2.4 1.6 0.2 0.8
Risk to age 75 1 in 276 1 in 2,420 1 in 499 1 in 988 1 in 7,008 1 in 1,747
Risk to age 85 1 in 166 1 in 1,482 1 in 310 1 in 419 1 in 3,984 1 in 802
Mean age 67.2 67.6 67.2 71.5 72.9 71.6

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 585 80 665 200 40 240
2015 595 80 675 205 40 245
2016 605 85 690 205 40 245

Figure B13(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of laryngeal cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of laryngeal cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B13(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of laryngeal cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of laryngeal cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B13(b): Survival and prevalence of laryngeal cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 482 56 538
5-year prevalence 1,891 220 2,111

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 84.7 81.9 84.4
95% confidence interval 83.1-86.3 76.8-86.1 82.9-85.9
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 62.7 59.4 62.3
95% confidence interval 60.4-64.9 53.1-65.4 60.2-64.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 71.0 69.7 70.8
95% confidence interval 68.2-73.7 61.8-77.6 68.2-73.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 80.4 77.8 80.1
95% confidence interval 77.4-83.3 69.3-86.3 77.3-82.9

Figure B13(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from laryngeal cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of laryngeal cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Lip cancer (C00)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat

Table B14(a): Incidence and mortality of lip cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 677 235 912 11 1 12
Crude rate 6.1 2.1 4.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
ASR 5.9 1.8 3.8 0.1 0.0 0.1
Risk to age 75 1 in 220 1 in 839 1 in 350 1 in 20,589   1 in 41,555
Risk to age 85 1 in 149 1 in 450 1 in 227 1 in 7,252 1 in 61,118 1 in 13,758
Mean age 60.8 69.0 62.8 61.3 77.0 62.6

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 740 265 1,010 10 5 15
2015 750 270 1,020 10 5 15
2016 760 270 1,030 10 5 15

Figure B14(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of lip cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of lip cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B14(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of lip cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of lip cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: ABS 2014b; AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B14(b): Survival and prevalence of lip cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 642 233 875
5-year prevalence 2,924 1,057 3,981

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 99.3 98.5 99.1
95% confidence interval 98.6-99.8 97.0-99.6 98.5-99.6
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 93.3 93.8 93.4
95% confidence interval 91.8-94.7 91.0-96.4 92.1-94.7
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 92.6 93.4 92.8
95% confidence interval 91.2-93.9 90.9-95.8 91.6-94.0
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 94.8 93.9 94.6
95% confidence interval 93.5-96.2 91.4-96.4 93.4-95.8

Figure B14(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from lip cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of lip cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Liver cancer (C22)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a stethoscope Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke

Table B15(a): Incidence and mortality of liver cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 1,041 406 1,446 976 514 1,490
Crude rate 9.4 3.6 6.5 8.6 4.5 6.6
ASR 9.0 3.1 5.9 8.3 3.7 5.9
Risk to age 75 1 in 150 1 in 451 1 in 226 1 in 171 1 in 417 1 in 244
Risk to age 85 1 in 84 1 in 242 1 in 127 1 in 87 1 in 196 1 in 123
Mean age 66.7 69.0 67.4 69.1 72.1 70.1

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 1,260 430 1,690 1,080 535 1,615
2015 1,320 445 1,760 1,150 565 1,715
2016 1,380 460 1,840 1,210 595 1,805

Figure B15(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of liver cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of liver cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B15(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of liver cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of liver cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B15(b): Survival and prevalence of liver cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 579 214 793
5-year prevalence 1,408 512 1,920

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 41.0 37.4 40.0
95% confidence interval 39.5-42.6 35.0-39.9 38.8-41.3
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 16.3 15.1 16.0
95% confidence interval 15.2-17.6 13.4-17.0 15.0-17.0
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 35.6 37.5 36.1
95% confidence interval 29.7-41.6 28.0-46.9 31.1-41.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 70.6 74.6 71.7
95% confidence interval 64.6-76.6 65.5-83.6 66.7-76.7

Figure B15(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from liver cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of liver cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Lung cancer (C33-C34)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a radiation symbol Square icon showing a stethoscope Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke

Table B16(a): Incidence and mortality of lung cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 6,409 4,102 10,511 4,882 3,255 8,137
Crude rate 57.6 36.6 47.1 43.2 28.5 35.8
ASR 56.2 31.4 42.5 41.8 23.7 31.8
Risk to age 75 1 in 26 1 in 41 1 in 32 1 in 38 1 in 58 1 in 46
Risk to age 85 1 in 13 1 in 23 1 in 17 1 in 17 1 in 29 1 in 22
Mean age 71.5 70.2 71.0 72.4 72.2 72.3

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 6,860 4,720 11,580 5,150 3,480 8,630
2015 6,990 4,890 11,880 5,190 3,600 8,790
2016 7,130 5,070 12,200 5,240 3,720 8,960

Figure B16(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of lung cancer, 1982-2016

figure16a

Figure B16(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of lung cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of lung cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B16(b): Survival and prevalence of lung cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 3,512 2,715 6,227
5-year prevalence 7,782 6,136 13,918

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 36.0 43.6 39.0
95% confidence interval 35.5-36.6 42.9-44.4 38.6-39.5
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 12.5 17.1 14.3
95% confidence interval 12.1-13.0 16.5-17.7 14.0-14.7
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 31.6 36.4 33.6
95% confidence interval 29.0-34.2 33.7-39.1 31.7-35.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 67.6 73.2 70.0
95% confidence interval 64.9-70.3 70.6-75.8 68.1-71.9

Figure B16(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from lung cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of lung cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Melanoma of the skin (C43)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing the sun

Table B17(a): Incidence and mortality of melanoma of the skin
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 6,734 4,835 11,570 1,039 476 1,515
Crude rate 60.6 43.1 51.8 9.2 4.2 6.7
ASR 58.5 39.0 48.0 9.0 3.4 5.9
Risk to age 75 1 in 23 1 in 33 1 in 27 1 in 187 1 in 456 1 in 266
Risk to age 85 1 in 14 1 in 24 1 in 18 1 in 84 1 in 240 1 in 129
Mean age 63.2 60.4 62.0 70.9 70.6 70.8
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 7,440 5,210 12,640 1,120 505 1,625
2015 7,640 5,320 12,960 1,160 515 1,675
2016 7,850 5,440 13,280 1,210 530 1,740

Figure B17(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of melanoma of the skin, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of melanoma of the skin in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B17(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates for melanoma of the skin, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of melanoma of the skin in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B17(b): Survival and prevalence of melanoma of the skin
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 6,383 4,606 10,989
5-year prevalence 27,402 20,962 48,364
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 96.3 98.3 97.1
95% confidence interval 96.0-96.6 98.0-98.5 96.9-97.3
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 88.2 93.5 90.4
95% confidence interval 87.6-88.7 92.9-94.0 90.0-90.8
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 90.4 94.5 92.2
95% confidence interval 89.9-90.9 94.0-94.9 91.8-92.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 95.8 97.6 96.6
95% confidence interval 95.3-96.3 97.2-98.1 96.3-97.0

Figure B17(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from melanoma of the skin, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of melanoma of the skin from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years. Neither drop below 70% over the 20-year period.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Mesothelioma (C45)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a stethoscope

Table B18(a): Incidence and mortality of mesothelioma
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 573 117 690 538 100 638
Crude rate 5.2 1.0 3.1 4.8 0.9 2.8
ASR 5.1 0.9 2.8 4.6 0.7 2.5
Risk to age 75 1 in 302 1 in 1,505 1 in 507 1 in 382 1 in 2,057 1 in 650
Risk to age 85 1 in 130 1 in 842 1 in 238 1 in 140 1 in 970 1 in 259
Mean age 73.3 73.3 73.3 74.4 74.0 74.3
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 640 145 780 575 125 700
2015 655 150 805 595 130 725
2016 675 155 830 620 135 755

Figure B18(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of mesothelioma, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of mesothelioma in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B18(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of mesothelioma, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of mesothelioma in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B18(b): Survival and prevalence of mesothelioma
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 357 86 443
5-year prevalence 647 162 809
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 43.1 47.7 43.9
95% confidence interval 41.1-45.1 43.3-51.9 42.1-45.7
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 5.2 8.4 5.8
95% confidence interval 4.4-6.2 6.2-11.0 4.9-6.7
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) n.p.(c)   n.p.(c)   n.p.(c)  
95% confidence interval n.p.(c)   n.p.(c)   n.p.(c)  
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 44.8 41.7 45.1
95% confidence interval 21.5-68.2 10.5-72.9 27.4-62.8

Figure B18(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from mesothelioma, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of mesothelioma from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 13 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).
  3. Survival estimates and confidence interval are not presented due to the high standard error.

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Mouth cancer (C03-C06)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injurySquare icon showing a person wearing a hard hat

Table B19(a): Incidence and mortality of mouth cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 356 215 571 76 43 119
Crude rate 3.2 1.9 2.6 0.7 0.4 0.5
ASR 3.0 1.6 2.3 0.6 0.3 0.5
Risk to age 75 1 in 392 1 in 760 1 in 518 1 in 1,714 1 in 6,239 1 in 2,707
Risk to age 85 1 in 272 1 in 483 1 in 350 1 in 1,293 1 in 3,819 1 in 1,960
Mean age 64.3 68.3 65.8 68.0 77.4 71.4
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 360 230 595 75 55 130
2015 370 235 605 75 55 130
2016 380 245 620 75 55 130

Figure B19(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of mouth cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of mouth cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B19(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of mouth cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of mouth cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B19(b): Survival and prevalence of mouth cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 312 167 479
5-year prevalence 1,057 670 1,727
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 82.0 83.6 82.6
95% confidence interval 79.8-84.0 80.8-86.1 80.9-84.2
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 57.0 63.7 59.6
95% confidence interval 54.2-59.8 60.0-67.3 57.3-61.8
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 65.8 74.0 69.0
95% confidence interval 61.8-69.8 69.7-78.3 66.0-71.9
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 72.1 81.8 76.1
95% confidence interval 67.4-76.8 77.1-86.5 72.8-79.5

Figure B19(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from mouth cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of mouth cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Multiple primary cancers (C97)

Table B20(a): Mortality of multiple primary cancers
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2012 mortality(a)
Number .. .. .. 312 194 506
Crude rate .. .. .. 2.8 1.7 2.2
ASR .. .. .. 2.8 1.3 1.9
Risk to age 75 .. .. .. 1 in 990 1 in 1,259 1 in 1,110
Risk to age 85 .. .. .. 1 in 259 1 in 589 1 in 376
Mean age .. .. .. 78.1 75.9 77.2
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)  
2014 .. .. .. 415 230 645
2015 .. .. .. 430 240 670
2016 .. .. .. 445 245 690

Figure B20(a): Mortality ASRs(a,b) of multiple primary cancers, 1982–2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of mortality of multiple primary cancers in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B20(b): Mortality (2012) rates of multiple primary cancers, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of mortality (2012) of acute multiple primary cancers in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Although a person can have more than one primary cancer, a diagnosis of 'multiple primary cancers' (ICD-10 code C97) is not used by cancer registries; rather, each of the person's cancers is coded separately. C97 only occurs in mortality data in cases when the certifying doctor cannot determine which of the cancers was the underlying cause of death. Because C97 is not a diagnosis used by cancer registries, prevalence and survival have not been calculated.

Myelodysplastic syndrome (D46)

Table B21(a): Incidence and mortality of myelodysplastic syndromes
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)
Number 829 480 1,309 268 156 424
Crude rate 7.5 4.3 5.9 2.4 1.4 1.9
ASR 7.6 3.4 5.2 2.4 1.0 1.6
Risk to age 75 1 in 304 1 in 532 1 in 388 1 in 1,889 1 in 3,296 1 in 2,407
Risk to age 85 1 in 95 1 in 203 1 in 134 1 in 323 1 in 942 1 in 506
Mean age 76.8 76.5 76.7 81.3 83.5 82.1
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)  
2014 910 490 1,400 275 165 440
2015 945 495 1,440 280 170 450
2016 975 500 1,480 290 175 465

Figure B21(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(a,b) of myelodysplastic syndromes, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of myelodysplastic syndromes in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B21(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of myelodysplastic syndromes, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of myelodysplastic syndromes in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2003–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B21(b): Survival and prevalence of myelodysplastic syndromes
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 549 353 902
5-year prevalence 1,742 1,175 2,917
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 72.5 74.6 73.3
95% confidence interval 70.7-74.2 72.4-76.6 71.9-74.6
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 36.5 40.3 38.0
95% confidence interval 34.5-38.6 37.8-42.8 36.4-39.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 43.4 45.9 44.4
95% confidence interval 38.2-48.5 40.3-51.6 40.6-48.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 49.7 57.6 53.4
95% confidence interval 40.8-58.6 49.5-65.6 47.4-59.4

Figure B21(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from myelodysplastic syndromes, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of myelodysplastic syndromes from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Myeloma (C90)

Table B22(a): Incidence and mortality of myeloma
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)
Number 886 647 1,533 470 364 834
Crude rate 8.0 5.8 6.9 4.2 3.2 3.7
ASR 7.7 4.9 6.2 4.1 2.5 3.2
Risk to age 75 1 in 191 1 in 268 1 in 223 1 in 469 1 in 742 1 in 576
Risk to age 85 1 in 96 1 in 149 1 in 118 1 in 162 1 in 275 1 in 209
Mean age 70.1 71.3 70.6 74.3 77.5 75.7
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)  
2014 975 700 1,680 535 405 940
2015 1,010 715 1,730 550 415 965
2016 1,050 735 1,780 570 425 995

Figure B22(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(a,b) of myeloma, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of myeloma in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B22(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of myeloma, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of myeloma syndromes in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B22(b): Survival and prevalence of myeloma
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 721 557 1,278
5-year prevalence 2,346 1,739 4,085
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 80.5 78.5 79.6
95% confidence interval 79.0-81.9 76.7-80.1 78.5-80.7
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 45.4 43.9 44.8
95% confidence interval 43.5-47.3 41.8-46.0 43.4-46.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 48.9 48.5 48.8
95% confidence interval 45.1-52.7 44.3-52.7 46.0-51.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 55.7 57.2 56.4
95% confidence interval 50.5-61.0 51.6-62.8 52.6-60.2

Figure B22(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from myeloma, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of myeloma from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML (C94.1, C94.3, C96.2, D45, D47.1, D47.3)

Table B23(a): Incidence and mortality of myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)
Number 359 293 651 80 81 161
Crude rate 3.2 2.6 2.9 0.7 0.7 0.7
ASR 3.2 2.3 2.7 0.7 0.5 0.6
Risk to age 75 1 in 471 1 in 628 1 in 539 1 in 3,781 1 in 4,495 1 in 4,109
Risk to age 85 1 in 246 1 in 352 1 in 293 1 in 1,158 1 in 1,658 1 in 1,385
Mean age 65.1 65.6 65.3 77.4 82.4 79.9
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)  
2014 320 300 625 95 95 190
2015 315 300 615 100 95 195
2016 310 300 610 100 100 200

Figure B23(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(a,b) of myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B23(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of other myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2003–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B23(b): Survival and prevalence of myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 301 264 565
5-year prevalence 1,392 1,327 2,719
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 91.5 93.7 92.5
95% confidence interval 89.7-93.0 92.1-95.1 91.3-93.6
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 71.8 81.7 76.4
95% confidence interval 69.2-74.3 79.0-84.1 74.5-78.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 74.6 82.7 78.4
95% confidence interval 71.6-77.6 80.0-85.4 76.4-80.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 77.1 80.1 78.5
95% confidence interval 73.2-80.9 76.3-83.8 75.8-81.2

Figure B23(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of myeloproliferative cancers excluding CML from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (C82-C85)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury

Table B24(a): Incidence and mortality of non-Hodgkin lymphoma
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 2,639 1,992 4,631 820 582 1,402
Crude rate 23.7 17.8 20.7 7.2 5.1 6.2
ASR 23.1 15.5 19.1 7.1 4.0 5.4
Risk to age 75 1 in 59 1 in 88 1 in 71 1 in 262 1 in 514 1 in 348
Risk to age 85 1 in 34 1 in 50 1 in 41 1 in 99 1 in 174 1 in 128
Mean age 64.3 66.8 65.4 73.7 76.3 74.7
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 2,780 2,170 4,940 830 605 1,435
2015 2,850 2,220 5,070 840 600 1,440
2016 2,930 2,270 5,200 850 595 1,445

Figure B24(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cancers in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B24(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cancers in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014). They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B24(b): Survival and prevalence of non–Hodgkin lymphoma
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 2,191 1,671 3,862
5-year prevalence 8,440 6,851 15,291

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 84.3 83.9 84.1
95% confidence interval 83.6-85.1 83.0-84.7 83.6-84.7
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 71.4 72.9 72.1
95% confidence interval 70.3-72.4 71.8-74.0 71.3-72.8
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 81.7 84.8 83.1
95% confidence interval 80.6-82.8 83.7-85.9 82.3-83.9
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 86.9 89.0 87.9
95% confidence interval 85.7-88.1 87.7-90.2 87.0-88.7

Figure B24(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from non–Hodgkin lymphoma, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cancers from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Non-melanoma skin cancer (C44)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing the sun Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke

Table B25(a): Incidence and mortality of non-melanoma skin cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 487 282 769 362 159 521
Crude rate 4.4 2.5 3.4 3.2 1.4 2.3
ASR 4.4 2.1 3.1 3.2 1.0 1.9
Risk to age 75 1 in 421 1 in 763 1 in 544 1 in 715 1 in 3,521 1 in 1,197
Risk to age 85 1 in 170 1 in 368 1 in 239 1 in 265 1 in 889 1 in 424
Mean age 70.7 70.8 70.8 76.3 84.0 78.7

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 530 315 845 345 175 520
2015 545 325 870 355 180 535
2016 565 330 895 360 185 545

Figure B25(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of non-melanoma skin cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of non-melanoma skin cancers in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B25(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of non-melanoma skin cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of non-melanoma skin cancers in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. For incidence data, ICD-10 C44 codes that indicate a basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin are not included. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B25(b): Survival and prevalence of non-melanoma skin cancer(a)
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 437 255 692
5-year prevalence 1,557 993 2,550

Relative survival in 2007-2011(c)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 89.3 88.2 88.9
95% confidence interval 87.6-90.9 85.9-90.2 87.5-90.1
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 70.0 73.7 71.5
95% confidence interval 67.2-72.7 70.4-76.9 69.4-73.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 77.5 81.7 79.2
95% confidence interval 74.4-80.6 78.3-85.1 76.9-81.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 89.7 92.2 90.8
95% confidence interval 86.5-92.8 89.0-95.4 88.6-93.1

Figure B25(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from non-melanoma skin cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of non-melanoma skin cancers from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. For survival and prevalence data, those ICD-10 C44 codes that indicate a basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin are not included.
  2. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  3. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Oesophageal cancer (C15)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing a stethoscope

Table B26(a): Incidence and mortality of oesophageal cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 991 404 1,395 879 324 1,203
Crude rate 8.9 3.6 6.2 7.8 2.8 5.3
ASR 8.6 3.0 5.6 7.4 2.2 4.7
Risk to age 75 1 in 159 1 in 559 1 in 249 1 in 201 1 in 876 1 in 329
Risk to age 85 1 in 85 1 in 230 1 in 127 1 in 97 1 in 339 1 in 155
Mean age 69.5 74.8 71.0 70.5 76.4 72.1

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 1,070 455 1,530 975 380 1,355
2015 1,110 465 1,570 1,000 385 1,385
2016 1,140 475 1,610 1,020 395 1,415

Figure B26(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of oesophageal cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of oesophageal cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B26(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of oesophageal cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of oesophageal cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012-2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002-2011 incidence data. The 2013-2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002-2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B26(b): Survival and prevalence of oesophageal cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 644 255 899
5-year prevalence 1,414 567 1,981

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 47.3 44.9 46.6
95% confidence interval 45.8-48.9 42.4-47.3 45.3-47.9
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 17.3 18.0 17.5
95% confidence interval 16.1-18.6 16.1-20.0 16.5-18.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 34.3 38.4 35.6
95% confidence interval 28.4-40.2 30.2-46.7 30.7-40.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 77.6 77.6 77.5
95% confidence interval 72.4-82.7 70.8-84.5 73.4-81.7

Figure B26(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from oesophageal cancer, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of oesophageal cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Cancer of other digestive organs (C26)

Table B27(a): Incidence and mortality of cancer of other digestive organs
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 81 104 185 646 594 1,240
Crude rate 0.7 0.9 0.8 5.7 5.2 5.5
ASR 0.7 0.7 0.7 5.7 4.0 4.7
Risk to age 75 1 in 2,917 1 in 4,390 1 in 3,514 1 in 375 1 in 569 1 in 453
Risk to age 85 1 in 1,132 1 in 1,310 1 in 1,210 1 in 136 1 in 199 1 in 164
Mean age 74.5 80.8 78.1 74.8 78.4 76.5

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 85 110 195 740 680 1,420
2015 90 110 200 765 695 1,460
2016 95 115 205 790 715 1,505

Figure B27(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(a,b) of cancer of other digestive organs, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of cancer of other digestive organs in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B27(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of cancer of other digestive organs, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of cancer of other digestive organs in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B27(b): Survival and prevalence of other digestive organs
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 32 31 63
5-year prevalence 76 70 146
 Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 21.3 19.4 20.3
95% confidence interval 16.4-26.7 15.1-24.3 17.0-23.8
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 12.9 11.3 12.1
95% confidence interval 9.1-17.5 7.8-15.5 9.4-15.1
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 54.4 49.0 51.9
95% confidence interval 32.3-76.5 24.2-73.8 35.3-68.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 68.8 90.5 79.4
95% confidence interval 45.0-92.5 74.7-106.3 65.2-93.6

Figure B27(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from other digestive organs, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of cancer of other digestive organs from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first year, then plateau over 19 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Other soft tissue cancers (C47, C49)

Table B28(a): Incidence and mortality of other soft tissue cancers
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(a)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 372 270 641 133 132 265
Crude rate 3.3 2.4 2.9 1.2 1.2 1.2
ASR 3.3 2.2 2.7 1.2 1.0 1.1
Risk to age 75 1 in 449 1 in 625 1 in 523 1 in 1,785 1 in 1,483 1 in 1,617
Risk to age 85 1 in 270 1 in 412 1 in 330 1 in 578 1 in 784 1 in 682
Mean age 58.8 60.5 59.5 66.6 68.2 67.4

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 370 280 650 155 130 285
2015 380 285 665 155 135 290
2016 390 290 685 160 135 295

Figure B28(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(a,b) of other soft tissue cancers, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of other soft tissue cancers in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B28(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of other soft tissue cancers, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of other soft tissue cancers in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  2. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2003–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B28(b): Survival and prevalence of other soft tissue cancers
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 283 241 524
5-year prevalence 1,038 944 1,982

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 83.0 84.9 83.9
95% confidence interval 80.8-85.0 82.6-87.0 82.3-85.4
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 65.0 67.7 66.2
95% confidence interval 62.1-67.8 64.6-70.7 64.1-68.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 76.8 76.7 76.8
95% confidence interval 73.6-80.0 73.3-80.1 74.5-79.1
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 90.5 90.2 90.4
95% confidence interval 87.7-93.2 87.3-93.0 88.4-92.4

Figure B28(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from other soft tissue cancers, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of other soft tissue cancers from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Ovarian cancer (C56)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a DNA stringSquare icon showing an ovum and three sperm

Table B29(a): Incidence and mortality of ovarian cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number .. 1,330 1,330 .. 933 933
Crude rate .. 11.9 .. .. 8.2 ..
ASR .. 10.4 .. .. 6.7 ..
Risk to age 75 .. 1 in 125 .. .. 1 in 208 ..
Risk to age 85 .. 1 in 81 .. .. 1 in 111 ..
Mean age .. 64.5 .. .. 71.5 ..

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 .. 1,430 1,430 .. 1,000 1,000
2015 .. 1,460 1,460 .. 1,020 1,020
2016 .. 1,480 1,480 .. 1,040 1,040

Figure B29(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of ovarian cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of ovarian cancer in females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B29(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of ovarian cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of ovarian cancer in females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B29(b): Survival and prevalence of ovarian cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence .. 1,054 1,054
5-year prevalence .. 3,806 3,806

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) .. 76.0 76.0
95% confidence interval .. 74.8-77.1 74.8-77.1
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) .. 43.0 43.0
95% confidence interval .. 41.7-44.3 41.7-44.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) .. 52.5 52.5
95% confidence interval .. 50.0-55.0 50.0-55.0
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) .. 78.1 78.1
95% confidence interval .. 76.0-80.2 76.0-80.2

Figure B29(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from ovarian cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of ovarian cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Pancreatic cancer (C25)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing an overweight person Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a stethoscope

Table B30(a): Incidence and mortality of pancreatic cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 1,425 1,322 2,748 1,331 1,193 2,524
Crude rate 12.8 11.8 12.3 11.8 10.5 11.1
ASR 12.5 9.8 11.0 11.3 8.4 9.8
Risk to age 75 1 in 116 1 in 158 1 in 134 1 in 135 1 in 202 1 in 162
Risk to age 85 1 in 56 1 in 71 1 in 63 1 in 63 1 in 83 1 in 72
Mean age 70.6 73.5 72.0 71.6 74.9 73.2

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 1,530 1,410 2,940 1,360 1,280 2,640
2015 1,570 1,460 3,030 1,400 1,310 2,710
2016 1,620 1,500 3,120 1,450 1,350 2,800

Figure B30(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of pancreatic cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of pancreatic cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B30(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of pancreatic cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of pancreatic cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012-2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002-2011 incidence data. The 2013-2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002-2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B30(b): Survival and prevalence of pancreatic cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 657 613 1,270
5-year prevalence 1,157 1,048 2,205

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 24.8 23.7 24.2
95% confidence interval 23.7-25.8 22.6-24.8 23.5-25.0
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 6.0 6.2 6.1
95% confidence interval 5.3-6.6 5.5-6.9 5.6-6.6
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 22.7 23.7 23.2
95% confidence interval 14.1-31.3 15.0-32.5 17.0-29.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 75.6 75.4 75.5
95% confidence interval 67.7-83.5 67.8-83.0 70.0-81.0

Figure B30(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from pancreatic cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of pancreatic cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Prostate cancer (C61)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing a DNA string

Table B31(a): Incidence and mortality of prostate cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 19,993 .. 19,993 3,079 .. 3,079
Crude rate 179.8 .. .. 27.2 .. ..
ASR 167.3 .. .. 27.6 .. ..
Risk to age 75 1 in 7 .. .. 1 in 119 .. ..
Risk to age 85 1 in 5 .. .. 1 in 28 .. ..
Mean age 68.2 .. .. 80.2 .. ..

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 17,050 .. 17,050 3,390 .. 3,390
2015 17,250 .. 17,250 3,440 .. 3,440
2016 18,140 .. 18,140 3,500 .. 3,500

Figure B31(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of prostate cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of prostate cancer in males from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B31(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of prostate cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of prostate cancer in males by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B31(b): Survival and prevalence of prostate cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 21,266 .. 21,266
5-year prevalence 86,207 .. 86,207

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 98.3 .. 98.3
95% confidence interval 98.1-98.4 .. 98.1-98.4
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 93.2 .. 93.2
95% confidence interval 92.8-93.5 .. 92.8-93.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 93.6 .. 93.6
95% confidence interval 93.4-93.9 .. 93.4-93.9
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 92.6 .. 92.6
95% confidence interval 92.2-93.1 .. 92.2-93.1

Figure B31(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from prostate cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of prostate cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years. Neither drop below 70% throughout the 20-year period.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Stomach cancer (C16)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing an apple Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury Square icon showing a person wearing a hard hat Square icon showing two chimneys emitting smoke

Table B32(a): Incidence and mortality of stomach cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 1,357 736 2,093 707 436 1,143
Crude rate 12.2 6.6 9.4 6.3 3.8 5.0
ASR 11.9 5.5 8.5 6.1 3.1 4.5
Risk to age 75 1 in 125 1 in 268 1 in 171 1 in 261 1 in 610 1 in 367
Risk to age 85 1 in 60 1 in 138 1 in 86 1 in 123 1 in 248 1 in 168
Mean age 69.9 71.6 70.5 70.9 74.8 72.4

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 1,460 785 2,240 700 415 1,115
2015 1,480 800 2,280 695 415 1,110
2016 1,510 815 2,330 690 410 1,100

Figure B32(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of stomach cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of stomach cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B32(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of stomach cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of stomach cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B32(b): Survival and prevalence of stomach cancer
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 906 441 1,347
5-year prevalence 2,471 1,287 3,758

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 51.8 51.4 51.6
95% confidence interval 50.4-53.1 49.5-53.3 50.6-52.7
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 26.4 28.3 27.0
95% confidence interval 25.1-27.6 26.6-30.1 26.0-28.0
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 49.2 53.7 50.7
95% confidence interval 45.7-52.7 49.3-58.0 48.0-53.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 87.4 90.7 88.6
95% confidence interval 84.6-90.3 87.5-93.9 86.5-90.8

Figure B32(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from stomach cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of stomach cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first 2 years, then plateau over 18 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Testicular cancer (C62)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing an ovum and three sperm

Table B33(a): Incidence and mortality of testicular cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 732 .. 732 25 .. 25
Crude rate 6.6 .. .. 0.2 .. ..
ASR 6.7 .. .. 0.2 .. ..
Risk to age 75 1 in 215 .. .. 1 in 6,334 .. ..
Risk to age 85 1 in 208 .. .. 1 in 5,440 .. ..
Mean age 36.2 .. .. 41.2 .. ..

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 770 .. 770 5 .. 5
2015 780 .. 780 5 .. 5
2016 795 .. 795 5 .. 5

Figure B33(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of testicular cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of testicular cancer in males from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B33(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of testicular cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of testicular cancer in males by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B33(b): Survival and prevalence of testicular cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 742 .. 742
5-year prevalence 3,380 .. 3,380
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 99.1 .. 99.1
95% confidence interval 98.6-99.4 .. 98.6-99.4
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 97.9 .. 97.9
95% confidence interval 97.2-98.4 .. 97.2-98.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 98.8 .. 98.8
95% confidence interval 98.3-99.2 .. 98.3-99.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 99.7 .. 99.7
95% confidence interval 99.3-100.1 .. 99.3-100.1

Figure B33(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from testicular cancer, Australia, 2007–2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of testicular cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years. Both do not show much change at all and neither drop below 80% throughout the 20-year period.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Thyroid cancer (C73)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a DNA string Square icon showing a radiation symbol

Table B34(a): Incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number 580 1,518 2,098 67 59 126
Crude rate 5.2 13.5 9.4 0.6 0.5 0.6
ASR 5.1 13.1 9.1 0.6 0.4 0.5
Risk to age 75 1 in 246 1 in 97 1 in 139 1 in 3,311 1 in 4,750 1 in 3,909
Risk to age 85 1 in 190 1 in 85 1 in 117 1 in 1,215 1 in 1,801 1 in 1,469
Mean age 54.4 50.9 51.9 71.7 77.1 74.3

Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2014 630 1,890 2,520 55 70 125
2015 660 1,980 2,640 55 70 125
2016 690 2,070 2,760 60 75 135

Figure B34(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of thyroid cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B34(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of thyroid cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of thyroid cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B34(b): Survival and prevalence of thyroid cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 504 1,482 1,986
5-year prevalence 2,057 6,482 8,539
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 95.8 97.9 97.3
95% confidence interval 94.8-96.7 97.4-98.2 96.9-97.7
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 92.1 97.0 95.8
95% confidence interval 90.5-93.6 96.3-97.5 95.2-96.3
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 95.1 98.9 98.0
95% confidence interval 93.8-96.4 98.5-99.4 97.6-98.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 96.0 99.4 98.6
95% confidence interval 94.5-97.6 98.8-99.9 98.1-99.1

Figure B34(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from thyroid cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of thyroid cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years. Both do not show much change at all and neither drop below 80% throughout the 20-year period.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Tongue cancer (C01-C02)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing a smoking cigarette Square icon showing a glass of beer Square icon showing a hand and forearm with an apparent injury

Table B35(a): Incidence and mortality of tongue cancer
Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 474 215 689 128 82 210
Crude rate 4.3 1.9 3.1 1.1 0.7 0.9
ASR 4.0 1.7 2.8 1.1 0.6 0.8
Risk to age 75 1 in 288 1 in 859 1 in 433 1 in 1,201 1 in 2,405 1 in 1,608
Risk to age 85 1 in 210 1 in 474 1 in 293 1 in 646 1 in 1,201 1 in 850
Mean age 62.2 65.4 63.1 68.9 71.2 69.8
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 480 220 695 130 70 200
2015 490 225 715 135 75 210
2016 505 230 735 135 75 210

Figure B35(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of tongue cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of tongue cancer in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B35(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of tongue cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of tongue cancer in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (see Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B35(b): Survival and prevalence of tongue cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)
1-year prevalence 372 183 555
5-year prevalence 1,361 639 2,000
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 82.0 84.3 82.8
95% confidence interval 80.1-83.8 81.6-86.7 81.2-84.2
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 61.9 66.0 63.2
95% confidence interval 59.4-64.4 62.3-69.5 61.2-65.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 72.8 74.6 73.4
95% confidence interval 69.6-75.9 70.3-78.9 70.8-75.9
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 80.8 85.4 82.4
95% confidence interval 77.2-84.5 80.9-89.8 79.6-85.2

Figure B35(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from tongue cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of tongue cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Cancer of unknown primary site (C80)(a)

Table B36(a): Incidence and mortality of cancer of unknown primary site
  Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)
Number 1,495 1,307 2,802 1,089 1,044 2,133
Crude rate 13.4 11.6 12.5 9.6 9.1 9.4
ASR 13.4 9.2 11.1 9.4 7.0 8.1
Risk to age 75 1 in 142 1 in 216 1 in 172 1 in 221 1 in 311 1 in 259
Risk to age 85 1 in 57 1 in 82 1 in 68 1 in 79 1 in 112 1 in 94
Mean age 74.1 76.2 75.1 75.2 77.9 76.5
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 1,430 1,210 2,640 1,160 1,180 2,340
2015 1,430 1,190 2,620 1,140 1,190 2,330
2016 1,430 1,180 2,610 1,130 1,200 2,330

Figure B36(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of cancer of unknown primary site, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of unknown primary site cancers in males and females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B36(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates for cancer of unknown primary site, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of unknown primary site cancers in males and females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. For mortality data before 2008, the applicable codes are C77–C80.
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B36(b): Survival and prevalence of unknown primary site
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)   Males Females Persons
1-year prevalence 564 504 1,068
5-year prevalence 1,682 1,329 3,011

Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)   Males Females Persons
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 24.6 18.8 21.8
95% confidence interval 23.5-25.7 17.7-19.8 21.1-22.6
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) 16.3 11.2 13.8
95% confidence interval 15.4-17.3 10.4-12.0 13.2-14.5
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) 64.8 57.4 61.6
95% confidence interval 61.3-68.2 53.0-61.7 58.9-64.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) 84.8 83.7 84.3
95% confidence interval 81.3-88.3 79.6-87.7 81.7-87.0

Figure B36(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from unknown primary site, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of unknown primary site cancers from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steeply in the first year, then plateau over 19 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates quickly increase in the first year, and then slowly increase over a period of 14 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007-2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010-2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014)

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

Uterine cancer (C54-C55)

Risk factors (a): Square icon showing an apple

Table B37(a): Incidence and mortality of uterine cancer
2011 incidence/2012 mortality(b)   Incidence - Males Incidence - Females Incidence - Persons Mortality - Males Mortality - Females Mortality - Persons
Number .. 2,238 2,238 .. 421 421
Crude rate .. 19.9 .. .. 3.7 ..
ASR .. 17.4 .. .. 3.1 ..
Risk to age 75 .. 1 in 65 .. .. 1 in 495 ..
Risk to age 85 .. 1 in 47 .. .. 1 in 232 ..
Mean age .. 65.0 .. .. 72.4 ..
Estimated number for 2014, 2015 and 2016(c)  
2014 .. 2,490 2,490 .. 405 405
2015 .. 2,570 2,570 .. 415 415
2016 .. 2,650 2,650 .. 425 425

Figure B37(a): Incidence and mortality ASRs(b,c) of uterine cancer, 1982-2016

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence and mortality of uterine cancer in females from 1982 to 2012, with estimates to 2016.

Figure B37(b): Incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) rates of uterine cancer, by age group

Line chart showing rate (per 100,000 people) of incidence (2011) and mortality (2012) of uterine cancer in females by age group. Age groups shown are: 0-4, 10-14, 20-24, 30-34, 40-44, 50-54, 60-64, 70-74 and 80-84.
  1. Based on IARC (2014) and WCRF & AICR (2007) (See Chapter 2).
  2. The 2011 incidence data include estimates for NSW and the ACT. Mean age for 2011 incidence was calculated excluding NSW and the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) Deaths registered in 2010 and earlier are based on the final version of cause of death data; deaths registered in 2011 and 2012 are based on revised and preliminary versions, respectively, and are subject to further revision by the ABS. ASRs were directly standardised to the Australian population as at 30 June 2001. Rates are expressed per 100,000 population.
  3. The 2012–2016 estimates for incidence are based on 2002–2011 incidence data. The 2013–2016 estimates for mortality are based on 2002–2012 mortality data (see Appendix G, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014) They are rounded to the nearest 10. Estimates less than 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 5. The estimates for males and females may not add to estimates for persons due to rounding.

Sources: AIHW ACD 2011; AIHW NMD.

Table B37(b): Survival and prevalence of uterine cancer
Males Females Persons
Prevalence as at the end of 2009(a)  
1-year prevalence .. 2,040 2,040
5-year prevalence .. 8,296 8,296
Relative survival in 2007-2011(b)  
1-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) .. 93.6 93.6
95% confidence interval .. 93.0-94.1 93.0-94.1
5-year relative survival at diagnosis (%) .. 82.5 82.5
95% confidence interval .. 81.5-83.4 81.5-83.4
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 1 year after diagnosis (%) .. 87.3 87.3
95% confidence interval .. 86.4-88.2 86.4-88.2
5-year conditional relative survival for those already survived 5 years after diagnosis (%) .. 95.4 95.4
95% confidence interval .. 94.6-96.3 94.6-96.3

Figure B37(c): Relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional survival from uterine cancer, Australia, 2007-2011

Line chart showing rate of relative survival of uterine cancer from 2007 to 2011 by years after diagnosis. Survival rates are grouped by relative survival at diagnosis and 5-year conditional relative survival. Survival rates drop steadily over 20 years for relative survival at diagnosis; while 5-year conditional relative survival rates slowly increase over a period of 15 years.
  1. Prevalence refers to the number of living people previously diagnosed with cancer, not the number of cancer cases.
  2. Relative survival was calculated with the period method, using the period 2007–2011 (Brenner & Gefeller 1996). Note that this period does not contain incidence data for 2010–2011 for NSW or the ACT (see Appendix F, Cancer in Australia: an overview 2014).

Source: AIHW ACD 2011.

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