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Diabetes and chronic kidney disease as risks for other diseases: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011

This report aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of the full health loss attributable to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It quantifies the impact of diabetes and CKD on the burden of other diseases for which there is evidence of a causal association (‘linked diseases’) to estimate the indirect burden caused by these 2 diseases. It uses disease burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and extends the standard approach for analysis of risk factors to model diabetes and CKD as risk factors. When the indirect burden due to linked diseases was taken into account, the collective burden due to diabetes was 1.9 times as high, and CKD was 2.1 times as high, as their direct burden.

Contribution of vascular diseases and risk factors to the burden of dementia in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011

This report describes a range of modifiable vascular risk factors for dementia, and estimates their individual and combined contribution to the burden of dementia in Australia. Vascular risk factors in this study include smoking, physical inactivity, mid-life high blood pressure and mid-life obesity, as well as vascular diseases that act as risk factors for dementia—diabetes, stroke, atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. It uses burden of disease estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and evidence in the literature that shows a link between these vascular risk factors and development of dementia in later life. It shows that about 30% of the total dementia burden in Australia is due to the joint effect of the vascular risk factors examined; highlighting the potential for preventing dementia and reducing dementia-related burden.

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011: methods and supplementary material

This document provides a detailed description of the methods used to derive the fatal and non-fatal burden of disease (using the disability-adjusted life years, years lived with disability and years of life lost measures) for the Australian and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations for 2011 and 2003, as well as estimates of how much of the burden can be attributed to various risk factors . The report is targeted at researchers and epidemiologists, and those seeking to further understand results provided in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011

This report provides estimates of the non-fatal and fatal burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population as well as estimates of the gap in disease burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The disease groups causing the most burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 were mental and substance use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. Indigenous Australians experienced a burden of disease that was 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians. Over one third of the overall disease burden experienced by Indigenous Australians could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, high body mass, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011—summary report

This summary report presents key findings from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s report Australian Burden of Disease Study: Impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011. It provides estimates of the burden due to different diseases and injuries for Indigenous Australians, estimates of the gap in burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the contribution of various risk factors to this burden.

Impacts of chronic back problems

Chronic back problems are common conditions in Australia (16% of the total population) and cause of disability (28% of the total population with disability) in Australia. Chronic back problems can have a strong negative effect on a person’s quality of life, affecting their ability to participate in daily activities, work, family and social activities. This bulletin provides the latest detailed information on the impacts (in terms of quality of life and disability) of chronic back problems in Australia.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011—summary report

This summary report presents key findings from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s report: Australian Burden of Disease Study: Impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011. It provides estimates of the burden due to different diseases and injuries in Australia and the contribution of various risk factors to this burden. It includes new analyses of the burden attributed to all dietary risk factors included in the study.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011

This report analyses the impact of nearly 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden). The study found that chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, mental and substance use disorders, and musculoskeletal conditions, along with injury contributed the most burden in Australia in 2011. Almost one third of the overall disease burden could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco use, high body mass, alcohol use, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010

This is the second report in the Australian Burden of Disease Study series. It provides estimates of fatal burden for 2010 for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population as well as estimates of the gap in fatal burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Injuries and cardiovascular diseases contributed the most fatal burden for Indigenous Australians (22% and 21% respectively), followed by cancer (17%).Subsequent reports in this series will provide estimates of the non-fatal burden and the contribution of various risk factors to disease burden in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. 

Australian Burden of Disease Study: fatal burden of disease 2010

This is the first report in the Australian Burden of Disease Study series. It provides estimates of fatal burden for 2010 showing the contribution of each disease group by age and sex. The three leading disease groups were Cancer (35%), Cardiovascular diseases (23%) and Injuries (13%), and these contributed more than 70% of total fatal burden.

Burden of disease due to asthma in Australia 2003

In 2003 asthma was the leading cause of burden of disease in Australian children, contributing 17.4% of total DALYs and the eleventh-leading contributor to the overall burden of disease in Australia, accounting for 2.4% of the total number of DALYs. Asthma also contributed a substantial proportion to the Indigenous health gap in the burden of non-communicable conditions. It is predicted that asthma will continue to rank as one of the major causes of disease burden in Australia for the next 2 decades, particularly among females.

The burden of disease and injury in Australia 2003

'The burden of disease and injury in Australia 2003' provides a comprehensive assessment of the health status of Australians. The report measures mortality, disability, impairment, illness and injury arising from 176 diseases, injuries and risk factors using a common metric, the disability-adjusted life year or DALY, and methods developed by the Global Burden of Disease Study. Burden of disease analysis gives a unique perspective on health. Fatal and non-fatal outcomes are integrated, but can be examined separately as well. This report provides detailed estimates of the burden of mortality and disability for each disease and injury category by sex and age. It also assesses the burden attributable to each of 14 major risk factors, and inequalities in the disease burden associated with socioeconomic disadvantage.

Health care expenditure and the burden of disease due to asthma in Australia

This report provides a summary of two aspects of the economic impact of asthma in Australia: health care expenditure on asthma and burden of disease attributable to asthma-related disability and premature mortality. The information contained in this report will help guide the formation of health policy in relation to asthma.

The burden of disease and injury in Australia (1996)

Provides a comprehensive assessment of the health status of Australians. The report measures mortality, disability, impairment, illness and injury arising from 176 diseases, injuries and risk factors using a common metric, the disability-adjusted life year or DALY, and methods developed by the Global Burden of Disease Study.

The burden of disease and injury in Australia (summary)

This document summarises the main findings of The Burden of Disease and Injury in Australia, which provides a comprehensive assessment of the health status of Australians. The report measures mortality, disability, impairment, illness and injury arising from 176 diseases, injuries and risk factors using a common metric, the disability-adjusted life year or DALY, and methods developed by the Global Burden of Disease Study.

The economic burden of diet related disease in Australia: paper prepared for the National Food and Nutrition Forum, Canberra 1992

Joint paper presented by AIHW and NHMRC for the National Food and Nutrition Forum, Canberra, 17-18 March 1992.